Archive for the ‘Lectures’ Category

Tevye’s Daughters

July 24, 2012

In this presentation, the fourth of her annual series on the beloved musical Fiddler on the Roof, Huttner will explore the character arcs of Teyve’s three eldest daughters (Tzeitel, Hodel, and Chava) and their transformation from page to stage.

Lecture #1: Tues Aug 7 at 12:15 PM at Northbrook Public Library

NPL = 1201 Cedar Lane; Northbrook, IL (Auditorium)

Lecture #2: Tues Aug 7 at 6 PM at Harold Washington Library Center

HWLC = 400 South State Street at Congress Parkway (Ground Floor “Multi-Purpose Room”)

Never Forget!

July 24, 2012

January marked the 70th anniversary of the Wannsee Conference, where the Final Solution, the annihilation of European Jewry, was planned. 2012 is also the 60th anniversary of the Luxembourg Agreement, when the Federal Republic of Germany, led by Chancellor Konrad Adenauer, took responsibility for the consequences of Nazi Germany’s horrendous genocide. German Historian Anette Isaacs, M.A., explores a multitude of Holocaust Memorials in Berlin.

When: Wednesday, July 25 at 12:15 PM

Where: Wilmette Public Library.

Professor Jeffry Mallow

July 24, 2012

On Wednesday, June 27, at Indian Trails Public Library District, Wheeling, Professor Jeffry Mallow, Honorary Chair of Chicago YIVO, spoke on “Yosl Rakover: The Mystery of a Holocaust Story” – how a Catholic priest and a secular Jew unearthed the truth.  The repeat lecture at Wilmette, on Wednesday, July 31, was sponsored by Joan D. Levin

Shevrin Programs

June 1, 2012

Click here to download flyer as a pdf –> 2012ShevrinFlyer

The Chicago YIVO Society invites you to Celebrate Father’s Day with Papa!

“Translating Sholem Aleichem”

Aliza Shevrin, currently the world’s foremost translator of Sholem Aleichem’s stories from Yiddish into English, will describe how she came to Sholem Aleichem’s huge corpus: what she picked first, how her choices have evolved, and what she has planned for the future.

When: Sunday, June 17 @ 2 PM

Where: Temple Beth Israel

Cost: $5 per person

Address: 3601 West Dempster Street; Skokie, IL

Parking: Ample Parking in Temple Lot

Refreshments: Kosher Snacks following Lecture

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Repeat Program: Monday June 18 @ 12:15 PM

Where: Northbrook Public Library

Cost: Free & Open to the Public!

Address: 1201 Cedar Lane; Northbrook, IL

Parking: Ample Parking in Library Lot

Refreshments: N/A

Lecture in Evanston

March 5, 2012

SPRING EVENTS: Join Chicago YIVO at Evanston Public Library for lecture by Professor Michael Steinlauf of Gratz College: Y.L. Peretz and Diaspora Nationalism.

Where: Evanston Public Library; 1703 Orrington Avenue; Evanston, IL

When: Sunday, March 25 @ 12:15 PM

COST: FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Michael Steinlauf teaches Jewish history and culture at Gratz College near Philadelphia. He holds an MA in Literature from Colombia University and a doctorate in Judaic Studies from Brandeis University. He is a contributing editor to the YIVO Encyclopedia of Jews in Eastern Europe, published by Yale University Press in 2008, and the co-editor, with Antony Polonsky, of Polin: Studies in Polish Jewry, v. 16 (2003), the first collection of studies focusing on Jewish popular culture in Poland and its contemporary afterlife. He is the author of Bondage to the Dead: Poland and the Memory of the Holocaust (1997), which examines how the experience of witnessing the Holocaust shaped Polish history and consciousness in the half century after the war. His writings have been translated into Hebrew, Polish, German and Italian.

Dr. Steinlauf has also been active in various kinds of Jewish memory work in Poland; he has lectured at the Krakow Jewish Culture Festival, taught in the Musicians’ Raft program organized by the Borderlands Foundation in Sejny, Poland, and served as chief historical advisor and curator of modern Jewish culture for the Museum of the History of Polish Jews. He is currently at work on a study of the Yiddish writer and activist Y. L. Peretz.

Click HERE to learn more about Dr. Steinlauf on the Gratz College website & read his complete CV.

Jewish Humor

June 3, 2011

Jewish Humor:

A Window into Jewish Culture

Date: July 25 (Mon)

Time: 12:15

Where: Wilmette Public Library

Loyola University Professor Jeffry Mallow was exposed to Jewish jokes early in life (his father told them) but his joke collection began in earnest when he was a graduate student and bought some books on Jewish humor. He was hooked. That led to his joke-collecting habit and many gigs as a standup comic with the Maxwell Street Klezmer Band.

Click HERE to read more about Mallow’s book (winner of an IPPY Humor Award).  Book-signing follows lecture 🙂

Traveling with Hodel (HWLC)

June 3, 2011

Program Co-Sponsored by ORT Urban Women 🙂

“There with my love, I’m home”

Traveling with Hodel from Sofievka to Siberia

Date: August 18 (Thurs)

Time: 6:00 PM

Where: Harold Washington Library Center

This is the 3rd of Jan Lisa Huttner’s annual lectures on Fiddler on the Roof leading up to the celebration of Fiddler’s 50th birthday in 2014.

Click HERE for more on the 1st lecture Stempenyu: From Berdichev to Broadway

Click HERE for more on the 2nd lecture Matchmaker, Matchmaker: From Boiberik to Broadway

 

Huttner writes the monthly “Tzivi’s Spotlight” columns in Chicago’s JUF News.

Traveling with Hodel (NPL)

June 3, 2011

“There with my love, I’m home”

Traveling with Hodel from Sofievka to Siberia

Date: August 18 (Thurs)

Time: 12:15 PM

Where: Northbrook Public Library

This is the 3rd of Jan Lisa Huttner’s annual lectures on Fiddler on the Roof leading up to the celebration of Fiddler’s 50th birthday in 2014.

Click HERE for more on the 1st lecture Stempenyu: From Berdichev to Broadway

Click HERE for more on the 2nd lecture Matchmaker, Matchmaker: From Boiberik to Broadway

 

Huttner writes the monthly “Tzivi’s Spotlight” columns in Chicago’s JUF News.

An Unlikely Friendship

June 3, 2011

Germany and Israel:

A story of guilt and an unlikely friendship

Date: July 28 (Thurs)

Time: 12:15 PM

Where: Northbrook Public Library

It is quite obvious that throughout the last six decades Israel and Germany have been connected through the Shoah and its aftermath. What at first glance seems to be a rather unlikely relationship—especially in light of the shared history—has evolved over time into a blossoming friendship and successful economic bond.  In order for this to happen Germany had to face its Nazi legacy and subsequent collective guilt.

In this 90-minute slide lecture, German historian Anette Isaacs discusses how her native country has attempted to cope with the guilt of causing the Holocaust and how this painful but necessary process heralded a new era in German-Israeli relations.

 

Let’s talk about germany!

Russian Jewish Culture

June 1, 2011

Date: August 29 (Mon)

Time: 12:15 PM

Where: Evanston Public Library

Bio: Irwin Weil was born in 1928 in CincinnatiOhio of German Jewish and Lithuanian Jewish immigrants. His father Sidney was a former owner of the Cincinnati Reds baseball team. Initially majoring in economics at the University of Chicago, he was drawn to Slavic studies after discovering Dostoevsky‘s The Brothers Karamazovin a required literature course and being (in his words) “knocked for a loop”. He reports that he ran to a bookstore, picked up a copy of Crime and Punishment, read it in two days, and resolved to learn the language of such a great body of literature.

Weil received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Chicago in 1948 and his master’s degree in Slavic studies in 1951. After three years of working on a Soviet census for the U.S. Library of Congress, Weil began his Ph.D. at Harvard University, where he had received aFord Foundation fellowship to work toward his doctorate in Slavic studies. After receiving the degree in 1960, he taught at Brandeis University.

While at Brandeis, Weil was a professor of Russian literature and linguistics. He was influential in the development and growth of the Slavic studies program at Brandeis. Weil’s first major work–a dissertation on the development of the writing style of Maksim Gorky–was completed in 1958. His other works include Notes on the Contemporary Soviet Literary Scene and Soviet Literary Activities.

Source: Irwin Weil, Wikipedia